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Opportunity to Participate in Pilot Testing for Epilepsy Measures

MNCM is pleased to announce a new partnership with the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) to test measure specification updates to AAN’s measure, Counseling for Women of Childbearing Potential with Epilepsy. MNCM is looking for neurology practices around the region that are interested in participating in this project. Dates of service would include November 1, 2019 through October 31, 2020, with submission via a HIPAA-secured File Transfer Protocol (FTP) in mid-November/early December 2020. If you are interested in participating in this project, please contact Jess Amo at amo@mncm.org.

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Get Ready for 2020 Data Reporting!

  • Required annual clinic and provider registration will open on November 1, 2019 for all Minnesota physician clinics as well as other medical groups that plan to participate in 2020 clinical quality reporting through MNCM. More information, including registration instructions, will be communicated in October.
  • The data submission deadlines for 2020 are as follows:
    • February 14, 2020: Colorectal Cancer Screening, Optimal Asthma Control/Asthma Education and Self-Management, Optimal Diabetes Care, Optimal Vascular Care
    • February 28, 2020: Depression Care Measures
    • March 20, 2020: Adolescent Mental Health and/or Depression Screening

Data collection guides and value sets will be available in October.

  • MNCM will be launching a new online MNCM Academy in November. This new tool will include educational courses about submitting clinical quality data to MNCM. Users will be able to view recorded presentations and take a brief knowledge quiz for a certificate of completion of each course. This resource will be available to both those who are new to quality reporting and data submission with MNCM, as well as to those who would like a refresher. Please stay tuned!

Questions? Contact us by email at support@mncm.org or call 612-746-4522.

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Thank You to New and Renewing Supporting Members of MNCM!

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Everyone benefits when the quality and affordability of healthcare in Minnesota improve. Organizations that join MNCM as supporting members become part of our pioneering work to empower decision makers with meaningful data to drive improvement and positively impact health care quality, cost, and patient experience.

MNCM is pleased to welcome the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce as its newest supporting member. The Minnesota Chamber of Commerce is the state’s largest business organization, representing more than 2,300 businesses of all types and sizes across Minnesota.

MNCM would also like to thank the following supporting members who have recently renewed their membership:

  • American Cancer Society
  • Avera Medical Group
  • CentraCare Health
  • Entira Family Clinics
  • FirstLight Health System
  • HealthPartners Medical Group
  • MN Rural Health Cooperative

MNCM offers supporting memberships for different types of organizations, including medical groups, health plans, advocacy organizations, and commercial businesses. For more information, please contact Dina Wellbrock at wellbrock@mncm.org or 612 454-4829.

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MNCM’s 2019 Seminar a Success!

MNCM’s 2019 Annual Seminar “Innovating Together” on Thursday, September 12 was a huge success!  More than 250 attendees benefited from multiple sessions with topics ranging from automation and big data in quality measurement, cost transparency and using data to drive improvement in primary care, specialty care, opioids, mental health, and more.

Thank you to all speakers, moderators, attendees, and sponsors for an invaluable day of learning and engagement!

Annual Seminar 2019

MNCM annual seminar session 2

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Important Update from Minnesota Community Measurement

AUGUST 29, 2019 – Minnesota Community Measurement (MCNM) is a nonprofit, multi-stakeholder collaborative organization that empowers the community by providing data and information to drive improvement in health care cost and quality. Founded in 2005, MNCM’s collaboration includes health care providers, health plans, employers, consumers, and state government.

Recently, the Minnesota Medical Association – a founding member of MNCM – notified us that they have decided to resign as a dues-paying member of MN Community Measurement. While this is unfortunate, MNCM will continue its work of bringing all stakeholders together to drive quality improvement that improves health and health care for all Minnesotans.

One of the most pressing issues in health care today is affordability of care, such as rising costs that are an increasing burden for employers, consumers, and taxpayers. At the same time, the Institute of Medicine estimates that as much as 30 percent of total U.S. health care spending is wasted – due to factors including missed opportunities for prevention and management of chronic disease, preventable complications, care fragmentation, overuse of certain services, high administrative costs, and others. Many strategies will be needed to solve this problem, and it is widely agreed that making sure our health care dollars are paying for value must be part of the solution. This means that we have to have good, evidence-based, and objective measurement of value.

MNCM has been a national leader in developing and using meaningful measures of health care quality – with an emphasis on measuring outcomes of care, including from the patient’s perspective. In order to truly transition to a health care system where payment is based on value rather than volume of services, it’s essential that this work continue. Indeed, it is spreading nationally. The federal government has prioritized exactly the types of measures that MNCM uses in developing the national Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). In fact, several MNCM-developed measures have been adopted into this national program. Minnesota health care providers are ahead of the curve nationally in their ability to measure and report on health care outcomes, in part because of the work of MNCM.

We know that measuring and reporting on health care quality makes a difference. Health care providers tell us they use our data extensively to understand how they compare to others and where they have the biggest opportunities for improvement. And we know that data drives change. Here are just four examples of how MNCM is making an impact in a relatively short period of time:

  • In 2004, only 12 percent of diabetic patients in Minnesota were receiving optimal care. Today, that number stands at 45 percent. That represents more than 100,000 additional Minnesotans with diabetes whose risk of major complications – such as heart attack, stroke, limb amputation, and blindness – is lower due to better management of their condition.
  • Depression is a costly condition, both in terms of medical costs and through its impacts on quality of life and workplace productivity. MNCM’s depression outcome measures have raised awareness throughout Minnesota about the importance of follow-up care and monitoring for patients who have depression. Since MNCM began measuring depression outcomes, rates of follow-up at 12 months have improved from 17% to 30%, representing nearly 15,000 more patients receiving this important care. Despite slow progress, the number of patients whose depression is in remission at 12 months has nearly doubled.
  • Since MNCM introduced its measure for adolescent mental health screening in 2015, the percentage of adolescents who receive screening at well-check visits has increased from 40 percent to 86 percent, representing an additional 68,000 teens who received this important screening.
  • Finding colon cancer at an early stage increases the rate of survival and is less costly to treat. Rates of screening for colorectal cancer in Minnesota have increased from 58% in 2006 to 71% today, which means that over 160,000 more Minnesotans are up to date on this important screening as a result of this improvement.

These are just a handful of positive outcomes that have resulted from our community being able to measure value and care. There is an axiom that says, “You can’t improve what you can’t measure.” With the help of many people and organizations, we have played an effective measurement and analysis role for the health care community.

It takes a lot of work for providers to report quality measures, and so MNCM is careful to make sure that the measures we use are meaningful and valuable. Measures are recommended by a committee that includes representation from health care providers, health plans, employers, consumers, and state government. Criteria for measure selection include whether the measure is meaningful (e.g., it affects a large number of people), evidence-based, whether there are opportunities for improvement (e.g., there is a known gap in care and/or high variability among providers), whether it is actionable, and whether it is feasible. Every year, MNCM reviews its list of measures to determine whether these criteria continue to be met – and retires measures that are no longer useful.

MNCM is particularly proud of work that it has launched in the past two years to make quality measures more timely and actionable while substantially reducing the burden on health care providers. In addition, we are working with health plans and health care providers on a new project to standardize and streamline data flows in ways that will make data less fragmented and more actionable – and set Minnesota up for success in value-based care.

These new initiatives came about as the result of listening to our stakeholders and asking what they need, and how MNCM can build on its strong foundation as a convener and as a trusted source of data to support them in achieving better quality and value in health care. We will continue to engage, listen, and respond to our stakeholders, welcoming all who wish to join us in this important collaborative work.

We thank our many partners, members and supporters for their continued contributions and participation. The more people we can have engaged in the process the better, but we will continue to advance our mission of improving the affordability, value, quality and access to health care with the countless partners who remain committed to that mission.

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SAVE THE DATE!

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On August 9, the American Psychiatric Association will host an event in the Twin Cities – Advancing and Sustaining Integrated Care in Minnesota. Integrating effective behavioral health into primary care through the Collaborative Care Model (CoCM) is evidence-based and shown to improve outcomes, prevent downstream health costs, and improve access to mental health services. At this event, participants will learn how health systems can implement this model, including practical strategies such as how services can be billed through the new CMS collaborative care management codes. Information and registration can be found on the American Psychiatric Association site.

Don’t forget to register for the Network for Regional Healthcare Improvements third annual National Affordability Summit in Minneapolis October 15-16. Learn more and register.

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Direct Data Submission Update

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Cycle A measures (Colorectal Cancer Screening, Depression Care, Optimal Asthma Control – Adult and Children, Optimal Diabetes Care, Optimal Vascular Care) have been approved, and final statewide results are published on MN Community Measurement’s health scorecard, MNHealthScores.org.

Cycle B measures (Adolescent Mental Health and/or Depression Screening, Spine Surgery Lumbar Discectomy/Laminotomy and Lumbar Fusion, and Total Knee Replacement) will be approved soon. The Adolescent Mental Health and/or Depression Screening final statewide results will be published on MNHealthScores.org in July, and the orthopedic measures will be published in October.

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